New York

DSCN0128It’s hard to describe my feelings of New York City. The first thing it has against it is it’s a big city; and I really dislike all big cities. Let’s face it, all large metropolises are overflowing with people, traffic, smells, dirt, filth, excess, greed, capitalism, advertising, and human pollution. New York City is no exception to this big city profile.

DSCN0133But NYC seems to have more of its fair share of what I refer to as a: Vegas feel. By Vegas feel I mean a kitsch, glossy, plastic, disingenuous, bright-lighted, vulgarity that acts as a thin veneer coating its big-city-ness. Surely NYC is all of these things and at the same time it is hypnotic, magnetic, and irresistible to most humans. The draw of NYC has on humans is like a moth’s unending attraction to a flame. It can’t resist coming closer and closer until eventually it is consumed by the very illumination that drew it to its demise. New York is our human flame.

Of course there is Central Park, a tiny island of nature surrounded on all sides by 00098.MTS.Still001humanities’ worst excesses. The park is a small respite from the big-city-ness of NYC, but it’s really not enough to get the bad taste out of your mouth.

So if I dislike the place so much why in the name of Darwin am I here? Good question and the answer is the: People’s Climate March. This was a pivotal event in human history and Julia and I both felt it important to be physically part of it. We marched in protest of our government’s lack of interest in creating policies that would force all of us to break our insatiable, addictive, and destructive want of fossil fuels. With us, as we strolled 00131.MTS.Still001through the heart of a city that is synonymous with the incorrect capitalistic philosophy that all resources on the Earth are endless and must be exploited and sold for a profit, were 400,000 others with a generally similar interest to our own. It was a mighty expression of some people’s desire for humanity to stop polluting and destroying our shared home: the Earth.

00143.MTS.Still001But alas, my belief is that the march will change nothing. The reason for my pessimism is mostly mathematical. Only one percent of the country’s total population attended the march. I’m sure there are a few more percent that did not attend the march and are like-minded. But, one or two percent of the entire population of the U.S. is not going to change our direction. I am afraid we’ll continue our addiction and ultimately destroy our civilizations. The good news is that it is typical human avarice for us to think such puny and insignificant creatures like ourselves will have any truly long lasting effect on this wonderful and precious planet. It’s been here for four billion years and I’m confident it’ll still be around for another four billion, long after the human race has passed into nothingness.